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Improve Google search results with Facebook SEO

Posted by Dhrub Raaj on August 5, 2010


Facebook hosted pages ranking well in external search engines like Google, Yahoo and Bing.

At the time, Facebook’s internal search emerged as one of the search engine engines tracked by comScore. comScore’s June 2010 U.S. Search Engine Rankings report shows that Facebook search queries have grown from 395 million in January of 2010 to 621 million queries in June. That’s almost half the monthly queries reported for Bing (1.7 billion) but not anywhere near the 10 billion plus queries on Google.

On Page Facebook SEO:

Pick your page name and vanity URL wisely. Use keywords in the “about” box when you write your description of the page as well as in the Overview section of the info tab.  Also, take advantage of FBML (Facebook Markup Language) to add custom content (text, images and links) that can includ relevant keywords that work together with your other keyword use.

When adding content like photos, discussion topics and status updates, think of keywords in titles when appropriate. Whenever you create a unique page on Facebook such as a discussion topic on a Fan page, there is an opportunity to implement most of the standard SEO tactics you would use with a web page.  If permissions allow, external sites can link to the discussion page, helping it to rank well in standard search engines outside of Facebook.

The newest opportunity to create content on Facebook that shows prominently in Facebook search results are Questions. Be thoughtful about keywords as you title your Facebook Question and the description. The more likes you get for your Question, the more like-ly it will show in search results, so make it interesting, descriptive, interactive (add a poll) and promote it to your network. You could also ask and answer your own questions.

As for getting your website’s pages into Facebook search results, Bing is the gatekeeper.  Facebook search results for out of network web pages are provided by Bing so inclusion in Bing is a necessity.

You can incorporate Facebook Open Graph protocol into your website and add a Like button to web pages for things like movies, sports teams, celebrities, and restaurants but there are many other types supported. Basically, this is a set of meta tags that you’d add to the template or source code of your site. Jesper Astrom offers his thoughts on how to get indexed and rank in Facebook Search here that explains how the meta data plus the signal of Likes performed by readers of your web page content can influence rankings on Facebook.

Off Page Facebook SEO:

Get links to your fan page or any other public pages from relevant, external web sites. That could be your blog or other social profiles as well as author bios or wherever it makes sense to link to your Facebook Fan page.  You can also attract links to your page by attracting more fans/likes. Each like is a link or vote for your page, so be sure to give them a reason to “like” your content. Here’s a nice quote from Jesper on the link vs. like topic:

“It is not the nominal number of fans on a page or in a group that makes your page rank. It is the social closeness of the page to the searcher that makes it rank. This means you shouldn’t spend all your money becoming number one. But you should spend your money on acquiring the right people to put you as number one, making you show up to all their friends and friends of friends when they search on related topics to you.”

by Lee Odden

Posted in SEO | Leave a Comment »

How to Respond to Google Place Page Reviews

Posted by Dhrub Raaj on August 5, 2010


Google recently announced that Businesses with verified Google Place Pages can respond to their reviews like can be done on other review sites.  This is a long-requested feature, especially by businesses that feel they were wrongly accused of something or that just want to offer a public “thank you” for a compliment.  Yelp has long allowed responses in this manner, and I’ve seen many small businesses respond with jabs and poorly considered comments.  With customers using online reviews as a part of the purchase decision, it’s more important than ever that you actively solicit reviews and manage them well.

Responding to reviews should be done with care, however.  Here are some tips for businesses that are going to begin responding to these reviews so you can avoid embarrassment and maximize the positive effect on your brand.

  • Never be defensive about negative reviews.  Even if the reviewer was completely wrong and is acting like a jerk.  You are going to be writing what amounts to public relations content in this reply and it needs to be your best work.  Everyone has a bad day, and this may have been theirs, so it’s worth it to try to rise above the fight or flight response.
  • Never write responses to negative reviews when you’re mad. Sleep on it.  Save it in notepad on your desktop and re-read it in a few days.  There’s no rush and things written in emotional moments are rarely what you want in public view.
  • Remember that the response will be read by more than just the reviewer. Over the months and years, your place page may be reviewed hundreds or thousands of times by potential customers making buying decisions based on others’ reviews.  It’s arguable that the content you put on this response is more important than most content you put on your website – and it deserves some thought.
  • Thank reviewers for their gift. It takes time to leave comments.  Doing so means they are doing you a favor and it is your chance to shine by responding with skill rather than duck and cover.  Sometimes reviews are just useless rants, but most people who read them realize this and you have a chance to show your stuff in the replies.
  • Short and Sweet. Don’t write an novel, just capture the sentiment, transfer the emotion and  move on.
  • Don’t just take the issue offline. Don’t respond telling them to call you to discuss.  Give some form of response on the web in public view, even if you end up continuing the conversation later.  Taking it offline has the feeling of whispering in front of dinner guests – it’s a bit rude.
  • Don’t get personal, even if they did. Sometimes reviewers write when they’re ticked off, and they attack specific employees of your company.  Simply mark these as inappropriate and use the established editorial process to remove them.  Google doesn’t want that type of review on there either.
  • Set Ground Rules with Employees. I recommend that you establish ground rules for who and how responses are created.  You may want to delegate review response, but not until you have a sense that your staff understand the importance of taking some time to get it right.
  • No Gifts. Don’t provide any freebies in your responses, such as gift certificates, etc.  This reads like bribery.  Just a public thank you is all you should do.
  • Take Ownership. You are responsible for your company, and sometimes business is just not fair.  You own both the issue and the response to it.   Many times reviewers just want to be listened to.
  • Nobody’s perfect, people know that.  But most importantly, you are speaking to future customers at this moment.   It’s okay to humanize the situation and admit that you just made a mistake and apologize.
  • Consider Having Someone review your response. Run it by someone (neutral, preferably) before you post it.  Ask them to put the reviewer’s and future customers’ shoes on and see how they feel.
  • Have some supporting content ready. If you frequently refer to policies make them easy to find.  An easy-to-navigate FAQ page can be a wonderful library to refer to.
  • There’s not always a good response. Sometimes, there is no response that will make the customer happy.  That’s life.  You should still tell the customer you appreciate them and wish things had turned out differently.  Remember, you’re speaking to future customers as well.
  • Ask customers who feel the issue was resolved to go edit their review. You shouldn’t ask them to remove what they wrote, but perhaps append a resolution to the end and consider re-rating your company.  This is a slippery slope – as you don’t want it to feel like they are in debt somehow.  But if an entire review is based on a misunderstanding, or a special case that is unlikely to happen again, many customers will be willing to give you another chance.

by Scott Clark

Ref: http://www.buzzmaven.com

Posted in SEO | Leave a Comment »

Link Wheel Can Generate Traffic

Posted by Dhrub Raaj on August 5, 2010


Link wheel building may help in attracting loads of traffic to our website or blog. A link wheel basically builds backlinks to our website or blog’s main page, allowing us to achieve a higher search engine ranking. This may be termed as a kind of link building.

You can build link wheels by following the 6 simple procedures given below:

1st Step: Write a squidoo lens and link it back to your website or blog. Sqidoo lens mainly refers to one person’s view expressed in the form of a single web page. The basic benefit of squidoo lens is that if someone is looking for recommendations regarding your topic area, your lens may lead them up to your website.

2nd Step: Write meaningful and information loaded article about your topic area, linking back to your squidoo lens, and submit the article to various article directories. Remember to submit your article in only and only your niche, otherwise it’ll just be a waste of time.

3rd Step: Next, create a hubpage of your topic and link it to the article you wrote and submitted to various directories. At Hubpages you can create a “hub”, which is basically one page of information of any topic. The biggest advantage of creating hubpages is that Google loves them and you are likely to rank higher if you’ve optimized your website keyword on the pages.

4th Step: Now build a Google Knol about your topic and include a link back to your Hubpage. Google Knol is designed to allow anyone to create a page on any topic which others can comment on, rate, and contribute to. It’s just like Wikipedia.

5th Step: Create a blogger blog and link it back to your Google Knol. In order to place links of different link wheels, the same blogger blog can be utilized.

6th Step: Lastly, you can end your link wheel either by leaving it “as it is” or by linking your website back to your blogger blog.

After following these simple steps, you’ll witness a considerable increase of your website’s ranking in the search engines.

Posted in SEO | Leave a Comment »

Detect Duplicate Content

Posted by Dhrub Raaj on August 5, 2010


The search engines can identify duplicate items.

Take a section of the content and enter it in quotations marks in a search engine. Search engine will distinguish the content to where it is copied.

Following are the tools for the detection of duplication of content by other websites:

CopyScape:

This copies web pages across the web. It gives an in detail duplicate content research. It offers comprehensive search for plagiarism detection.

Plagiarism checker:

This tool will allow you to enter a keyword, phrase or sentence to search if the same words is entered or used by someone else. This also helps in setting up alerts so it notifies if content is being copied.

Plagiarisms detect:

This tool will detect after analyzing if upload text and word doc files if it is copied. Two documents can be compared side by side in this.

Plagium:

Plagium will show the date of when it was discovered. You may also translate the text for the checking if duplication.

Virante:

It checks internal duplicate content issues.

Webconfs:

This checks the similarities of urls. The lower the percentage the less similar the two pages are.

Ref: SeoGP

Posted in SEO | Leave a Comment »

Build Links with Twitter

Posted by Dhrub Raaj on August 5, 2010


Social media marketing platforms like Twitter can be used for their link building efforts. A very few internet markers must be conscious of the opportunities provided by Twitter. Twitter cannot just be used as a tool to strengthen your link building campaign but can also be employed as a communicative pitch to build links and keep abreast of the latest gossip.

Let’s take a look at the link building views with Twitter:

1. Research Your Industry Specific Websites on Twitter

You can recognize hundreds of websites within your niche and industry with whom you can communicate and build links by searching Twitter through tools like Twitter Search. Enter your related keywords when search in Twitter, see who is talking about them, visit their website through their Twitter profile and ask them for a link exchange.

2. Contact Website Owners

After examining, jot down those contacts from whom you want to acquire links. It’s better to step by step build a relationship before contacting them directly, this will save you from being rejected because if you are an active follower of a person, they’ll never want to let you go and easily allow links exchange. Many times, they’ll be glad that you asked.

3. Remain an Updated Link-Builder with Twitter

If you’re a person who doesn’t know what the latest trends are, be lucky with Twitter. Find the latest gossip encircling your niche, see the generators of those stories, and listen to them. The more you know what’s going on within your business area, the more link building chances you’ll be able to explore.

4. Quality Back Links with Twitter

Twitter also holds manual link building benefits through tweets. Although the links on Twitter are no followed but by building your followers list and enhancing the Page Rank of your Twitter profile, you can obtain some quality back links for your website. How? By inserting keywords into a tweet, integrating keywords into your short URL, making your tweets linkable, making tweets retweetable and posting tweets at the most retweetable time of the day.

By SeoGP

Posted in Twitter | Leave a Comment »

Prevent Specific Spiders From Crawling Our Pages

Posted by Dhrub Raaj on August 5, 2010


There are three different ways of blocking spiders. Before we start, however, you’ll need some fundamental data to work from in order to identify specific spiders reliably. These are mainly the User Agent header field (a.k.a., identifier) and, in the case of Copyscape, the spider’s originating IP address.

Basic Spider Data: User Agents

Yandex (RU)
Russian search engine Yandex features the following User Agents:

Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; YandexBlogs/0.99; robot; B; +http://yandex.com/bots)
Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; YandexBot/3.0; +http://yandex.com/bots)
Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; YandexBot/3.0; MirrorDetector; +http://yandex.com/bots)
Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; YandexMedia/3.0; +http://yandex.com/bots)
YandexSomething/1.0

Goo (JP)
Japanese search engine Goo features the following User Agents:

DoCoMo/2.0 P900i(c100;TB;W24H11) (compatible; ichiro/mobile goo; +http://help.goo.ne.jp/help/article/1142/)
ichiro/2.0 (http://help.goo.ne.jp/door/crawler.html)
moget/2.0 (moget@goo.ne.jp)

Naver (KR)
Korean search engine Naver features the following User Agents:

Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; NaverBot/1.0; http://help.naver.com/customer_webtxt_02.jsp)

Baidu (CN)
China’s number-one search engine Baidu features the following User Agents:

Baiduspider+(+http://www.baidu.com/search/spider.htm)
Baiduspider+(+http://www.baidu.jp/spider/)

SoGou (CN)
Chinese search engine SoGou features the following User Agents:

Sogou Pic Spider/3.0( http://www.sogou.com/docs/help/webmasters.htm#07)
Sogou head spider/3.0( http://www.sogou.com/docs/help/webmasters.htm#07)
Sogou web spider/4.0(+http://www.sogou.com/docs/help/webmasters.htm#07)
Sogou Orion spider/3.0( http://www.sogou.com/docs/help/webmasters.htm#07)
Sogou-Test-Spider/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 5.5; Windows 98)
sogou spider
Sogou Pic Agent

Youdao (CN)
Chinese search engine Youdao (which also spells itself “Yodao” on occasion) features the following User Agents:

Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; YoudaoBot/1.0; http://www.youdao.com/help/webmaster/spider/; )
Mozilla/5.0 (compatible;YodaoBot-Image/1.0;http://www.youdao.com/help/webmaster/spider/;)

Majestic-SEO
Link analysis service Majestic-SEO http://www.majesticseo.com/ is using the distributed search engine Majestic-12:

Majestic-12
UA: Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; MJ12bot/v1.3.3; http://www.majestic12.co.uk/bot.php?+)

Copyscape
Copyscape Plagiarism Checker – Duplicate Content Detection Software
Site info: http://www.copyscape.com

Copyscape
User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Windows NT 5.1)
IP: 212.100.254.105
Host: googlealert.com

Copyscape works in an underhanded manner, hiding its spider behind a generic User Agent and a domain name that gives you the entirely false impression of somehow being connected to Google while in reality it belongs to Copyscape itself.

This means that you cannot identify their sneaky spider via the User Agent header field. The only reliable way to block it is via their IP.

Blocking Spiders via robots.txt

For a general introduction to the robots.txt protocol, please see: http://www.robotstxt.org/

Search engines are called to disclose which code to deploy in a given robots.txt file to deny their spiders access to a site’s pages. Moreover, the page outlining this process should be easy to find.

Regrettably, most spiders listed above feature their robots.txt specs only in Chinese, Japanese, Russian, or Korean — not very helpful for your average English speaking webmaster.

The following list features info links for webmasters and the code you should actually deploy to block specific spiders.

Yandex (RU)
Info: http://yandex.com/bots gives us no information on Yandex-specific robots.txt usage.

Required robots.txt code:

User-agent: Yandex
Disallow: /

Goo (JP)
Info (Japanese): http://help.goo.ne.jp/help/article/704/
Info (English): http://help.goo.ne.jp/help/article/853/

Required robots.txt code:

User-agent: moget
User-agent: ichiro
Disallow: /

Naver (KR)
Info: http://help.naver.com/customer/etc/webDocument02.nhn

Required robots.txt code:

User-agent: NaverBot
User-agent: Yeti
Disallow: /

Baidu (CN)
Info: http://www.baidu.com/search/spider.htm

Required robots.txt code:

User-agent: Baiduspider
User-agent: Baiduspider-video
User-agent: Baiduspider-image
Disallow: /

SoGou (CN)
Info: http://www.sogou.com/docs/help/webmasters.htm#07

Required robots.txt code:

User-agent: sogou spider
Disallow: /

Youdao (CN)
Info: http://www.youdao.com/help/webmaster/spider/

Required robots.txt code:

User-agent: YoudaoBot
Disallow: /

Because the robots.txt protocol doesn’t allow for blocking IPs, you’ll have to resort to either of the two following methods to block Copyscape spiders.

Blocking Spiders via .htaccess and mod_rewrite

Seeing that not all spiders are abiding by the robots.txt protocol, it’s safer to block them via .htaccess and mod_rewrite on Apache systems.

Like robots.txt, the .htaccess file applies to single domains only. For a solution covering your entire Web server, please see the section on Apache’s httpd.conf below.

Here’s a simple example for blocking Baidu and Sogou spiders:

In your .htaccess file, include the following code:

RewriteEngine on
Options +FollowSymlinks
RewriteBase /

RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Baiduspider [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Sogou
RewriteRule ^.*$ – [F]

Explanation:

  1. The various User Agents to be blocked from access are listed one per line.
  2. The Rewrite conditions are connected via “OR”.
  3. “NC”: “no case” – case-insensitive execution.
  4. The caret “^” character stipulates that the User Agent must start with the listed string (e.g. “Baiduspider”).
  5. “[F]” serves the spider a “Forbidden” instruction.

Thus, if you want to block Yandex spiders, for instance, you can use the following code:

RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} Yandex

In this particular case the block will be effected whenever the string “Yandex” occurs in the User Agent identifier.

As mentioned above, Copyscape can only be blocked via their IP. The specific code is:

RewriteCond %{REMOTE_ADDR} ^212.100.254.105$

Blocking Spiders via the Apache Configuration File httpd.conf

An alternative method of blocking spiders can be executed from the Apache webserver configuration file by listing the pertinent User Agent header fields there. The main advantage of this approach is that it will apply to the entire server (i.e., it’s not limited to single domains). This can save you lots of time and effort, provided you actually wish to apply these spider blocks uniformly across your entire system.

Include your new directives in the following section of Apache’s httpd.conf file:

# This should be changed to whatever you set DocumentRoot to.
#

SetEnvIfNoCase User-Agent “^Baiduspider” bad_bots
SetEnvIfNoCase User-Agent “^Sogou” bad_bots
SetEnvIf Remote_Addr “212\.100\.254\.105″ bad_bot

Order allow,deny
Allow from all

Deny from env=bad_bots

By Ralph Tegtmeier, S.E. Watch

Posted in SEO | Leave a Comment »

Social Media And Games Dominate Activity : What Americans Do Online?

Posted by Dhrub Raaj on August 4, 2010


Americans spend nearly a quarter of their time online on social networking sites and blogs, up from 15.8 percent just a year ago (43 percent increase) according to new research released today from The Nielsen Company. The research revealed that Americans spend a third their online time (36 percent) communicating and networking across social networks, blogs, personal email and instant messaging.

Top 10 Sectors by Share of U.S. Internet Time

RANK

Category

Share of Time
June 2010

Share of Time
June 2009

% Change in
Share of Time

1

Social Networks

22.7%

15.8%

43%

2

Online Games

10.2%

9.3%

10%

3

E-mail

8.3%

11.5%

-28%

4

Portals

4.4%

5.5%

-19%

5

Instant Messaging

4.0%

4.7%

-15%

6

Videos/Movies

3.9%

3.5%

12%

7

Search

3.5%

3.4%

1%

8

Software Manufacturers

3.3%

3.3%

0%

9

Multi-category Entertainment

2.8%

3.0%

-7%

10

Classifieds/Auctions

2.7%

2.7%

-2%

 

Other

34.3%

37.3%

-8%

Source: The Nielsen Company

“Despite the almost unlimited nature of what you can do on the web, 40 percent of U.S. online time is spent on just three activities – social networking, playing games and emailing leaving a whole lot of other sectors fighting for a declining share of the online pie,” said Nielsen analyst Dave Martin.



 

 

Additional findings include:

  • Online games overtook personal email to become the second most heavily used activity behind social networks – accounting for 10 percent of all U.S. Internet time. Email dropped from 11.5 percent of time to 8.3 percent.
  • Of the most heavily-used sectors, videos/movies was the only other to experience a significant growth in share of U.S. activity online. Its share of activity grew relatively by 12 percent from 3.5 to 3.9 percent. June 2010 was a major milestone for U.S. online video as the number of videos streamed passed the 10 billion mark. The average American consumer streaming online video spent 3 hours 15 minutes doing so during the month.
  • Despite some predictions otherwise, the rise of social networking hasn’t pushed email and instant messaging into obscurity just yet. Although both saw double-digit declines in share of time, email remains as the third heaviest activity online (8.3 percent share of time) while instant messaging is fifth, accounting for four percent of Americans online time.
  • Although the major portals also experienced a double digit decline in share, they remained as the fourth heaviest activity, accounting for 4.4 percent of U.S. time online.

Email Remains Top on Mobile Internet Activities

The way U.S. consumers spend their Internet time on their mobile phones paints a slightly different picture to that of Internet use from computers. In a Nielsen survey of mobile web users, there is a double-digit (28 percent) rise in the prevalence of social networking behavior, but the dominance of email activity on mobile devices continue with an increase from 37.4 percent to 41.6 percent of U.S. mobile Internet time.

Portals remain as the second heaviest activity on mobile Internet (11.6 percent share of time), despite their double digit decline and social networking’s rise to account for 10.5 percent share means the gap is much smaller than a year ago (14.3 percent vs. 8.3 percent).

Other mobile Internet activities seeing significant growth include music and video/movies, both seeing 20 percent plus increases in share of activity year over year. As these destinations gain share, it’s at the cost of other content consumption – both news/current events and sports destinations saw more than a 20 percent drop in share of U.S. mobile Internet time.

“Although we see similar characteristics amongst pc and mobile internet use, the way their activity is allocated is still pretty contrasting, added Martin. While convergence will continue, the unique characteristics of computers and mobiles, both in their features and when and where they are used mean that mobile Internet behavior mirroring its PC counterpart is still some way off.”

Ref :- 1. http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/online_mobile/what-americans-do-online-social-media-and-games-dominate-activity/

2. http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/

<!–[endif]–><!–[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 <![endif]–><!–[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]–> <!–[endif]–>

What Americans Do Online: Social Media And Games Dominate Activity

August 2, 2010

Americans spend nearly a quarter of their time online on social networking sites and blogs, up from 15.8 percent just a year ago (43 percent increase) according to new research released today from The Nielsen Company. The research revealed that Americans spend a third their online time (36 percent) communicating and networking across social networks, blogs, personal email and instant messaging.

Top 10 Sectors by Share of U.S. Internet Time

RANK

Category

Share of Time
June 2010

Share of Time
June 2009

% Change in
Share of Time

1

Social Networks

22.7%

15.8%

43%

2

Online Games

10.2%

9.3%

10%

3

E-mail

8.3%

11.5%

-28%

4

Portals

4.4%

5.5%

-19%

5

Instant Messaging

4.0%

4.7%

-15%

6

Videos/Movies

3.9%

3.5%

12%

7

Search

3.5%

3.4%

1%

8

Software Manufacturers

3.3%

3.3%

0%

9

Multi-category Entertainment

2.8%

3.0%

-7%

10

Classifieds/Auctions

2.7%

2.7%

-2%

 

Other

34.3%

37.3%

-8%

Source: The Nielsen Company

“Despite the almost unlimited nature of what you can do on the web, 40 percent of U.S. online time is spent on just three activities – social networking, playing games and emailing leaving a whole lot of other sectors fighting for a declining share of the online pie,” said Nielsen analyst Dave Martin.

<!–[if gte vml 1]> <![endif]–><!–[if !vml]–>us-time-spent-online<!–[endif]–>

<!–[if gte vml 1]> <![endif]–><!–[if !vml]–>time-spent-internet-US<!–[endif]–>

Additional findings include:

  • Online games overtook personal email to become the second most heavily used activity behind social networks – accounting for 10 percent of all U.S. Internet time. Email dropped from 11.5 percent of time to 8.3 percent.
  • Of the most heavily-used sectors, videos/movies was the only other to experience a significant growth in share of U.S. activity online. Its share of activity grew relatively by 12 percent from 3.5 to 3.9 percent. June 2010 was a major milestone for U.S. online video as the number of videos streamed passed the 10 billion mark. The average American consumer streaming online video spent 3 hours 15 minutes doing so during the month.
  • Despite some predictions otherwise, the rise of social networking hasn’t pushed email and instant messaging into obscurity just yet. Although both saw double-digit declines in share of time, email remains as the third heaviest activity online (8.3 percent share of time) while instant messaging is fifth, accounting for four percent of Americans online time.
  • Although the major portals also experienced a double digit decline in share, they remained as the fourth heaviest activity, accounting for 4.4 percent of U.S. time online.

Email Remains Top on Mobile Internet Activities

The way U.S. consumers spend their Internet time on their mobile phones paints a slightly different picture to that of Internet use from computers. In a Nielsen survey of mobile web users, there is a double-digit (28 percent) rise in the prevalence of social networking behavior, but the dominance of email activity on mobile devices continue with an increase from 37.4 percent to 41.6 percent of U.S. mobile Internet time.

<!–[if gte vml 1]> <![endif]–><!–[if !vml]–>us-mobile-time-spent<!–[endif]–>

Portals remain as the second heaviest activity on mobile Internet (11.6 percent share of time), despite their double digit decline and social networking’s rise to account for 10.5 percent share means the gap is much smaller than a year ago (14.3 percent vs. 8.3 percent).

Other mobile Internet activities seeing significant growth include music and video/movies, both seeing 20 percent plus increases in share of activity year over year. As these destinations gain share, it’s at the cost of other content consumption – both news/current events and sports destinations saw more than a 20 percent drop in share of U.S. mobile Internet time.

“Although we see similar characteristics amongst pc and mobile internet use, the way their activity is allocated is still pretty contrasting, added Martin. While convergence will continue, the unique characteristics of computers and mobiles, both in their features and when and where they are used mean that mobile Internet behavior mirroring its PC counterpart is still some way off.”

Ref :- 1. http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/online_mobile/what-americans-do-online-social-media-and-games-dominate-activity/

2. http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

One Way Link Building For Improving The Site Ranking

Posted by Dhrub Raaj on August 4, 2010


The best helpful thing in SEO process for improving the site rankings in major Search engines’ like Google, Yahoo! Search and Bing is one way link building. All of the best SEOs and Webmasters suggest having one way link building.

Following 10 tips will help you in having more one way links for your website -

  1. Create an attractive and Useful website –Build a website which is unique and exciting so, online public can automatically give you back-link through forums, blogs and their own sites. People would unsurprisingly give you link if they like your website.
  2. Directories Submission – Directories are actually significant in gaining one way links. We have many good free as well as paid web directories available online which can give you quality back link to  your website.
  3. Three way link exchange - Though, managing three way links is a tough job but they really work because Search engine robots will treated them as one way links.
  4. Forum posting and Forum Signature – Whenever you join any forum, attempt all of the features like you can have links in your Signature which will be automatically comes with your every post and thread you make in the forum.
  5. Blogging – There are many blogging sites providing you free space where you can write your own view on your wish topic and can be popular online.
  6. Commenting on other blogs – Take your time and try reading blogs on the related themes of your website and use the comments sections where you can provide your link.
  7. Social Networking Profiles – Use social networking sites and make a profile where you can add your website link and can get a free one way link. Social networking  is a great online tool.
  8. Article Submissions – Write some useful articles on your site topic and submit in article submission directories like ezinearticles.com, articlebase.com and so many others to get free one way links.
  9. Press Releases – Submit your press release in some of great PR submission sites like pr.com, prlog.com etc. There are still many PR submission sites where we can have a website linking option.
  10. Social Bookmarking – Submit your site links in social bookmarking sites as your favorites and get free one way links from there too.

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Some Ping Websites

Posted by Dhrub Raaj on August 4, 2010


Ping service helps us in listing our blog post URL on theirs ping websites; thus our blog gets back-links and traffic. Here is the list of ping websites that we can use -

    http://pingomatic.com/

    http://feedburner.google.com/fb/a/ping

    http://pingates.com/index.php

    http://www.pingmyblog.com/

    http://autopinger.com/

    http://pingdevice.com/

    http://www.pingoat.com/

      Posted in SEO | Leave a Comment »

      Business Organization Should have a Wikipedia article

      Posted by Dhrub Raaj on August 3, 2010


      By Matt McGee

      When someone types your company name into Google, you want to own as many of the results as possible. Your company web site, your blog (if it has a different URL), your Facebook business page, your Yelp listing, and other business profile pages will often rank highly. This is good. You control these pages, and the more search results you control, the less likely an angry blogger or questionable news article will show up on page one.

      Wikipedia is a rankings powerhouse and almost always shows up on page one, especially on Google. So, while having a Wikipedia page for your small business may sounds like a good idea, in most cases I don’t think it is. Here’s why.

      Qualifying for a Wikipedia Page

      Most small businesses don’t qualify for a Wikipedia page, making the pros/cons debate of this article a moot point. Sure, anyone can create a Wikipedia page, but if you (or anyone, for that matter) make a page for a business that doesn’t belong, moderators/administrators will remove it. As the site’s Help pages indicate, Wikipedia is not a directory.

      To qualify for a Wikipedia article, your small business must have received some measure of notoriety; it must be noteworthy for some kind of accomplishment. Wikipedia has a page detailing the notability guidelines that determine what fits and what doesn’t. Notability will often come in the form of high-level media or news exposure. A feature article in your local paper won’t cut it. A feature article in TIME magazine? That might be good enough.

      Or maybe not. Consider this: Charm City Cakes, the Baltimore bakery that’s featured in the Food Network’s Ace of Cakes program, has a Wikipedia page at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charm_City_Cakes … but the page is actually about the show, not the small business. Junior’s Cheesecake, on the other hand, is a famous New York restaurant and it has a Wikipedia page. In fact, there are a number of small businesses with Wikipedia pages — a fact that reveals how difficult it is to determine what’s notable enough and what’s not.

      • Zip’s Drive-In, a small fast food shop, has a Wikipedia article.
      • Burger Ranch, another small fast food chain, also has a Wikipedia article, but note that it’s been flagged with an alert at the top: “This article may not meet the general notability guideline.”
      • Tekserve has a Wikipedia article. It’s a New York-based Apple sales and service provider.
      • Sparks Steak House in New York is also on Wikipedia, but not for business-related reasons. It’s notable for being “the establishment where Gambino crime family boss Paul Castellano and mobster Thomas Bilotti were gunned down” in 1985.
      • Hollywood-based Roscoe’s House of Chicken and Waffles has a Wikipedia article.

      As you can see, there are small businesses that have a Wikipedia article. It’s not impossible. So, let’s say your small business is notable enough. The question remains, should you have a Wikipedia page?

      The Pros of Having a Wikipedia Article

      In no particular order:

      1. Great exposure. Wikipedia is a heavily used web site, and having an article about your company means more exposure, more eyeballs, and so forth.

      2. Reputation management. As I mentioned above, your Wikipedia article will probably rank on page one for your company name, and that helps with your online reputation management.

      3. Increased trust. There’s no underestimating the need to earn trust, both from customers and search engines. A Wikipedia article can help with both, I believe.

      The Cons of Having a Wikipedia Article

      Again, in no particular order:

      1. You don’t have a say in what’s said about you. Even if you qualify for a Wikipedia article about your business, Wikipedia will frown on you or an employee creating the page, and they’ll frown on you even updating or correcting the page. You don’t meet the neutral point of view policy. Your best bet for influencing the article is to have a Wikipedia account in good standing and, after identifying yourself as a company employee, be active on the “Talk” page for your article, suggesting additions or corrections you think someone should make. But you can’t make the changes yourself, and this may prove very frustrating.

      2. It requires constant monitoring. If your small business is operating on such a level that you deserve a Wikipedia article, there’s a chance that you’ll have some competition and/or some angry customers or disgruntled employees that would love to make you look bad. While you can’t go in and edit your own Wikipedia article, they probably can. So you have to be extra vigilant in watching for updates and then hope that you can find someone to correct or edit any untruthful information that someone adds. In some situations, this monitoring can become very time-consuming.

      3. No room for error. The exposure and notoriety that comes with having a Wikipedia article means you have almost no room for error when it comes to future business mistakes. Your CEO makes the news after his picture is taken outside a strip club? That’ll show up on your Wikipedia page. An ex-employee files a discrimination suit against you? That’ll show up, too.

      Finally

      The exposure and status of being the subject of a Wikipedia article might be a good idea. That’s especially true for small businesses with the time and resources to monitor their Wikipedia article and help make any needed corrections.
      on Sep 17, 2009 in MY BEST POSTSReputation Mgmt.
      Read more: http://www.smallbusinesssem.com/should-small-business-have-wikipedia-article/2311/#ixzz0vWI7S4aV

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